Child Support

Our family law attorneys are dedicated to helping our clients through the difficult decisions that come with divorce. Among these decisions are those which are vital because they involve the security of your most precious assets…your children. Once child custody has been decided, there will likely be an issue of child support. This is the money which the non-custodial parent will be ordered to pay to the custodial parent to be used for the needs of the child.

 

Paternity

Of course, before the issue of child support is brought into the divorce case, one may need to establish paternity. It is the man’s choice to voluntarily confirm that he is the father of any children involved, or he may choose to have his paternity tested. The court may also order a paternity test. Once the husband has been proven to be the father, he could be ordered to pay child support. It is also possible that the mother  would be ordered to pay child support. Child support orders do not necessarily guarantee visitation. For example, in a case where a domestic abuse lawyer is needed, the abusive spouse may be ordered to pay child support, but denied visitation.

 

Amount of Child Support

In Massachusetts, just as in many other states, the amount of child support to be paid will depend on many factors. One of those factors will be the estimated cost of taking care of the child on a day to day basis, as well as accounting for medical and educational needs in the future. How much each parents’ income is will also weigh in on the decision. In some cases, where physical custody is shared, no child support is ordered, but both parents are expected to fulfill the financial needs of the child.

 

Divorce Areas of Experience

Duration of Child Support

Child support will be paid until the child no longer depends on their parents (up to age 21), or finishes school (up to age 23). Child support is not tax deductible, and is not counted in the income of the custodial parent. Even if the parent paying support becomes sick, loses a job, or becomes bankrupt, they are still required by law to make the child support payments.  In some cases, however, a child-support-payer may petition the court and show a material change which makes him or her unable to pay the allotted amount. The court will then decide whether or not the original child support ruling stands.

Choosing the Best Child Support Attorney

In order to protect yourself and the future of your children in a child support case, you will need the best family law attorney in Boston. Our Boston divorce attorneys will fight to ensure that your children are protected and that you receive the support that you need to care for them. Only a child support attorney will understand the laws and use them for the benefit of your child.

 

The contents of this website do not constitute legal advice, and do not establish an attorney-client relationship. Representative case results are provided as examples only, and do not guarantee or imply the same or similar results for other cases, which are evaluated on their individual merits.

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